Leveraging Celebrities to Enhance Your Cause Marketing

In cause campaign efforts, celebrity involvement can help catalyze momentum to reach and engage your audience when it is approached and strategized correctly. What does it really mean to find the right celebrity for your cause and collaborate together to create an authentic partnership? What is the best way to navigate the triangular dynamic between brand, cause, and celebrity? Nancy Gofus, the COO of Public Interest Registry, had the opportunity to explore this topic with a fantastic panel of experts at this year’s Cause Marketing Forum in Chicago on May 29, 2013:

Connie Fontaine, Director, Marketing Communications, Ford of Canada
Nancy Gofus, COO, Public Interest Registry
Joel Goldman, Director of Entertainment Industry Relations, Malaria No More
René Jones, Founding Director, United Talent Agency Foundation

The leading message of this panel was that in order for cause campaigns to be effective, stories need to be told; more importantly, they need to be authentic. Additionally, the ultimate goal for brands, nonprofits and celebrities is a win-win-win situation. In order to be successful, nonprofits and charities that are organizing cause campaigns need to identify an advocate that would not only be able to relate to and support their mission, but that would also be appealing to their audience.

There is a big difference between booking talent for a commercial cause marketing spot versus a public service announcement.  For a commercial cause marketing spot, you need to find an advocate that is truly connected to the cause, who would be more willing to donate their time to show their support. Alternatively, talent agencies will be looking to collect heavy lump sums of money to book their clients, especially when the spot ad is for a large commercial brand.

From the brand perspective, you’ll want the talent to be proud to be affiliated with your company. Again, the relationship needs to grow organically and the story that you seek to tell needs to be authentic. When this relationship is met with a cause campaign, the dynamic becomes incredibly powerful and the potential to move audiences to demonstrate social good increases.

If you are either a brand or celebrity, or are working on a cause campaign, check out the video clip from the forum above. There are some great takeaways!

Litterati: Crowdsource-Cleaning the Planet

Jeff Kirschner came up with the idea for the “Litterati” movement after his young daughter spotted a piece of litter floating in a river near his home in Northern California. “Daddy, that doesn’t go there,” she said.

Feeling the need to create a movement to stop the world’s littering habit, Jeff came up with the idea to take a picture of litter he found and post the photo to Instagram, using the hashtag #Litterati. He began encouraging people across the world to share pictures on Instagram of litter they found before disposing of the trash. Using the #Litterati hashtag, picking up trash became a social – and oftentimes artistic – activity.

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A @Litterati Instagram photo

It was not hard to find others eager to help rid their communities of mindless litter. With “Litterati” quickly growing, Jeff started to organize tagged #Litterati photos from all over the world into a “Digital Landfill” on http://www.Litterati.org.

Using Instagram’s geo-tagging and time-stamp features, Jeff could also track where and at what time the pieces of litter were found. He built a map on Litterati.org showing all of the locations across the world in which participants are finding and picking up litter, using the #Litterati hashtag. In addition to the litter map, the Litterati website also presents statistics of litter data for public viewing. Currently, 13,059 pieces of trash have been picked up around the world by Litterati participants – and that number is quickly growing.

Jeff has big plans for how he uses all of this Litterati data:

“I believe Litterati is in a position to create a level of environmental awareness that touches millions of lives,” he writes in an email. “Litterati will be able to work with local government, helping city officials understand more about where trash is emerging, and which brands are the most commonly littered.  We’ll collaborate with brands to help them better understand the lifecycle of their product packaging, so that they can move towards earth-friendly designs. Whether it’s a young child, a government official, or high-powered executive, our goal is to inspire people to take ownership of the [litter] problem.”

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One of Litterati’s maps of litter collection

Public Interest Registry chose to spotlight Litterati.org because we love the way Jeff is using his dotORG to help solve our world-wide littering problem. Litterati’s core values of integrity, collaboration, and simplicity resonate with our own, and we fully support Jeff’s use of the Internet to reach other people across the world interested in cleaning up the Earth.

Imagine the impact we could make if every single person in the world disposed of just one piece of litter. In Jeff’s words, “Global collaboration is paramount towards reaching a litter-free world. Individually, we can make a difference. Together, we can make an impact.”

Visit www.litterati.org to view Litterati’s impact so far. Use the hashtag #Litterati on Instagram to join the Litterati movement! You can also follow @Litterati on Instagram and Twitter.

ResellerClub and Public Interest Registry’s Growth in India

ResellerClub recently interviewed our Channel Manager, Anand Vora, who shared his thoughts about HostingCon and his experience working with ResellerClub.

HostingCon was held recently in Austin, Texas. This particular event is a great platform for registries to see what people are doing, especially in relation to the newTLDs that are coming to the Internet. With the newTLD applications, Public Interest Registry has applied for .NGO, .ONG, and 4 International Domain Names (IDNs).

A big thank you to ResellerClub and all of the resellers that have helped us develop messaging and gain a lot of growth in India through their channels!

Back to the Future, Making an Impact on the Way.

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Today marks the 28th anniversary of Back to the Future’s theatrical release in 1985. For nearly two decades, the critically acclaimed, science-fiction comedy film has delighted audiences with its memorable cast, musical score, iconic references, and of course, the DeLorean time machine.  Ronald Reagan even quoted the movie in his State of the Union Address when he said, “Roads…where we’re going, we don’t need roads”. The legacy of BTTF will surely live on for generations to come.

Today is not only a day to celebrate Back to the Future’s release and cultural impact, but it is also an opportunity to highlight the notable efforts of a foundation that was created by Marty McFly’s real-life counterpart, Michael J. Fox.

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Fox was diagnosed with young-onset Parkinson’s disease in 1991. Although this news was not made public for another 7 years, he has since committed himself to Parkinson’s research through his organization, the Michael J. Fox Foundation, which he founded in 2000. In its campaign to pinpoint the cause of Parkinson’s and uncover a cure within our lifetime, the Michael J. Fox Foundation has become the leading Parkinson’s fundraiser in the US, putting over $140M into research (The Guardian).

According to the foundation’s core values, the team is 100% patient-focused, comprised of risk-takers and problem-solvers that won’t stop until a cure is found – one that will improve the lives of people living with Parkinson’s today. Fox is correct when he says: “The cures we want aren’t going to fall from the sky. We have to get ladders and climb up and get them.”

With Fox, there was a story beyond a DeLorean time machine that needed to be told. After getting a better understanding of the core values of his foundation and how they are impacting lives every day, it truly makes us happy at Public Interest Registry to see the Michael J. Fox Foundation carrying out its cause and mission on the .ORG platform.

As the longstanding operator of .ORG, it makes us proud to see individuals, groups, companies and organizations working towards improving the lives of people through this online space. It is also comforting to learn that the values of .ORGs like the Michael J. Fox Foundation are directly in sync with our own values — to build a true sense of community, ensure trust and credibility, and to help make the world a better place – both online and off.

Marty McFly would be proud to see the impact that his real-life counterpart and the Michael J. Fox foundation is making an impact on the way back to the future.

Taking Rachel’s Challenge.

“I have this theory that if one person can go out of their way to show compassion, then it will start a chain reaction of the same. People will never know how far a little kindness can go.”

These words were written by 17 year old Rachel Joy Scott shortly before her life was taken during the Columbine High School shooting in 1999.

Investigations following the shooting revealed that Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold, the gunmen, were often isolated from the rest of their peers. They had each kept journals in which they wrote about their interactions with other students and expressed their disdain. Both of the shooters were publicly classified as gifted children that had allegedly been victims of bullying for four years. This in turn has focused more attention on the link between bullying and school violence.

Did you know:

  • An estimated 1.6 million children in grades six through 10 in the United States are bullied at least once a week. — Human Rights Education Center of Utah
  • Six out of 10 American teenagers witness bullying in school once a day. — National Education Association
  •  A reported 160,000 (15% of all) students don’t show up for school each day out of fear of being bullied while at school — (Fried & Fried, 2003).
  • Every seven minutes, a child on an elementary playground is bullied (Pepler, Craig, & Roberts, 1998).

In memory of Rachel and her compassion for people, her family started Rachel’s Challenge; a series of student-empowering programs and strategies that were created based on Rachel’s writings and artwork, and whose ongoing mission is:

“to inspire, equip and empower every person to create a permanent positive culture change in their school, business and community by starting a chain reaction of kindness and compassion.”

The core component of Rachel’s Challenge is a school assembly that tells the story of Rachel Scott to inspire change among students (in elementary, middle and high schools) to treat others with respect. The results and feedback from this initiative have truly been remarkable. According to the Rachel’s Challenge research:

  • It was found in Texas that there were 90% fewer disciplinary referrals in elementary schools within the state in just a few months after any Rachel’s Challenge program was initiated.
  • A High School in Illinois experienced 84% fewer out-of-school suspensions after having initiated a Rachel’s Challenge program.
  • 78% more students indicated they would intervene in a bullying incident after seeing Rachel’s Challenge.
  •  In a recent 24 month period, Rachel’s Challenge received more than 450 emails from students who indicated they had changed their mind about taking their own life after Rachel’s Challenge made their school a better and more caring place.

We can all learn from Rachel and her chain reaction theory, which has become one of the most recognized anti-bullying initiatives. The key takeaways are:

  • Take Off Your Labels… Be Who You Really Are
  • Appropriate Affection
  • Our Words Have the Power…to Hurt or Heal
  • You are Not Alone…We Have Shared Experiences
  • Today is YOUR Chain Reaction Moment

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This week, Public Interest Registry has chosen to highlight the work of Rachel’s Challenge because this organization has successfully used their dotORG as an amazing platform to carry out their cause and mission and to help improve the lives of others. Rachel’s story is also one that anyone can relate to, and we want to be a part of the chain reaction that she has started. To date, Rachel’s message has touched more than 19 million people. Every single one of these people will help continue the legacy of making a difference in their communities.

 

If you would like to donate to Rachel’s Challenge, please click here.

 

Domínio .ONG será chancela de credibilidade para ongs internacionais via @idgnow

Fonte Original: IDGNOW
Por Cristina De Luca
Publicada em 17/06/2013 10:00

Grande parte das organizações não governamentais sem fins lucrativos, sobretudo em mercados emergentes, se depara com o obstáculo de provar sua legitimidade, principalmente na internet, onde as ações de crowdfunding e campanhas de arrecadação de fundos através de doações voluntárias.

Pensando nisso, a Public Interest Registry (PIR), desde 2003 gestora do domínio .ORG – são mais de 10 milhões de sites – viu na recente leva de expansão de domínios genéricos de primeiro nível da internet uma oportunidade para solicitar a criação dos domínios .ONG/.NGO, e expandir sua atuação, garantindo às organizações do terceiro setor, uma presença online “certificada”.

“Ao saber da expansão, pensamos em criar formatos que pudessem beneficiar as organizações sem fins lucrativos, nossas clientes ou não, e outras tantas ongs que hoje encontram dificuldade em ter uma presença global na rede, por seu tamanho ou ou por sua atuação local”, diz Link Nancy Gofus, ex-executiva da Verizon que, desde 2012, dirige as operações da PIR.

A ideia foi atrelar a concessão dos registros .ONG/.NGO (sim, ao registrar um, a entidade receberá automaticamente o outro) a um rigoroso processo de validação da organização sem fins lucrativos, no contexto local e global. Só ongs legítimas, filantrópicas e de interesse público, sem nenhum foco comercial, terão o registro. “Vamos atestar que a organização é de fato sem fins lucrativos, sem foco comercial e político, é independente e segue as leis do país onde opera”, diz Nancy.

“Além da questão da credibilidade, muitas dessas organizações enfrentam problemas para serem achadas na rede”, prossegue Nancy. Por isso, os registros .ONG/.GNO contarão com uma espécie de catálogo online _ uma espécie de páginas amarelas com um pequeno perfil com informações sobre o seu trabalho e links para mídias sociais _ onde as organizações sem fins lucrativos poderão expor seus trabalhos, suas campanhas para arrecadação de donativos e recursos, trocar informações e experiências com outras ongs de atuação similar em diversos países.

“Vamos construir o primeiro diretório global de ONGs. Esperamos que essa iniciativa mude o uso da internet para aqueles que estão mudando o mundo. A torne mais útil”, afirma Nancy, lembrando que muitas ongs não têm nenhuma presença na internet. O catálogo daria a elas uma página na internet, antes mesmo que terem condições de criarem seus próprios sites.

A intenção, portanto, é proporcionar às ongs um local seguro e confiável que lhes permita aumentar as oportunidades de engajamento, consciência e financiamento.

No catálogo, as ongs serão catalogadas por causa defendida, país, e região entre outros critérios que facilitem a busca. E terão acesso a ferramentas para o recebimento de doações através da página do seu perfil no catálogo. Outros serviços adicionais irão acompanhar os novos domínios. A intenção da PIR é a de , durante os três primeiros anos de operação, reverter parte da renda  com os registros para a oferta de projetos educacionais e ferramentas online focadas na expansão do conhecimento e capacitação das entidades no uso da internet.

Trabalho já começou
Embora a expectativa da PIR seja a de os novos domínios só estejam disponíveis em 2014, em função do longo e moroso processo de autorização da Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), entidades que desejem ter o registro dod domínios .ONG/.OGN já podem entrar no site da PIR e manifestar seu interesse.

O envio dessa manifestação coloca as ongs no radar da PIR, que pode já iniciar o processo de validação, e as permite estarem permanentemente informadas sobre o desenvolvimento de todos os processos de lançamento dos domínios.

“O Brasil já é o terceiro país em quantidade de organizações interessadas, atrás de EUA e Índia”, comenta Nancy, que visitou o país no início do mês para conversar com entidades brasileiras a respeito da iniciativa.

A muitas delas, Nancy explicou que os registros .ONG/.OGN são complementares ao registro .ORG.BR e até mesmo ao registro .ORG, embora muitas das mais de 10 milhões de organizações com o registro .ORG não preenchem os requisitos para terem os novos registros.

“É evidente que o Google.org não é uma organização sem fins lucrativos”, afirma Nancy, dando uma dimensão do quão rigoroso o processo de validação será.

“Há uma mistura grande de organizações que utilizam o .ORG. Há ongs, mas há também entidades de responsabilidade social de empresas privadas, clubes esportivos, associações comunitárias, igrejas”, diz Nancy.

No Brasil, o registro do domínio .ORG.BR já exige a apresentação de documentação que comprove a natureza da instituição não governamental sem fins lucrativos, de acordo com a legislação brasileira, e o CNPJ. Nos casos em que a instituição é um consulado ou uma embaixada, a exigência do CNPJ é dispensada. Até o momento, foram concedidos pelo Registro.br 47.659 registros .ORG.BR.

Como o Resgistro.br, a PIR é uma organização sem fins lucrativos. Nos últimos 2 anos (entre 2010 e 2012) viu os registros .ORG crescerem 47% na Ásia/Oceania, 25% na América Latina e 23% na África.

A atuação internacional deverá crescer ainda mais a partir disponibilidades dos domínios .ONG/.NGO. No Brasil,o domínio .ORG está disponível através de revendas de domínio e registradores autorizados. O mesmo deverá ocorrer com os novos domínios, embora a intenção da PIR seja contar com conselhos locais na tarefa de validação das ongs.