Join @Sept11Memorial Today in Honoring the 12th Anniversary of 9/11

Today’s .ORG highlight is in honor of the 12th Anniversary of 9/11.

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The National September 11 Memorial & Museum (www.911memorial.org), located at the site of the World Trade Center, is a tribute to the (nearly 3,000) victims that lost their lives during the terror attacks on September 11, 2001, as well as those who were killed in the WTC bombing in February 1993.

About the design:

In 2003, an international competition was held to find a design for the new 9/11 Memorial. In total, there were 5,201 submissions across 63 different countries. Below is an excerpt from statement of the winners of the design competition, Michael Arad and Peter Walker, who had submitted their idea of “Reflecting Absence”:

This memorial proposes a space that resonates with the feelings of loss and absence that were generated by the destruction of the World Trade Center and the taking of thousands of lives on September 11, 2001 and February 26, 1993. It is located in a field of trees that is interrupted by two large voids containing recessed pools. The pools are set within the footprints of the Twin Towers. A cascade of water that describes the perimeter of each square feeds the pools with a continuous stream. They are large voids, open and visible reminders of the absence.

The surface of the memorial plaza is punctuated by the linear rhythms of rows of deciduous trees, forming informal clusters, clearings and groves. This surface consists of a composition of stone pavers, plantings and low ground cover. Through its annual cycle of rebirth, the living park extends and deepens the experience of the memorial.

Surrounding the pools on bronze parapets are the names. The enormity of this space and the multitude of names underscore the vast scope of the destruction. Standing there at the water’s edge, looking at a pool of water that is flowing away into an abyss, a visitor to the site can sense that what is beyond this parapet edge is inaccessible.

The memorial plaza is designed to be a mediating space; it belongs both to the city and to the memorial. Located at street level to allow for its integration into the fabric of the city, the plaza encourages the use of this space by New Yorkers on a daily basis. The memorial grounds will not be isolated from the rest of the city; they will be a living part of it.

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After nearly a decade of looking at photos of what once was, we can now proudly look at this Memorial and Museum as a positive stepping-stone forward.

The Public Interest Registry team would like to send its condolences to all of those who have lost friends, family members, or colleagues during 2001 and1993, as well as the firemen, policemen, and response units that worked relentlessly to save others. Today we honor them, we will never forget.

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For more information about the 9/11 Memorial & Museum, please visit www.911memorial.org.

 

Back to the Future, Making an Impact on the Way.

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Today marks the 28th anniversary of Back to the Future’s theatrical release in 1985. For nearly two decades, the critically acclaimed, science-fiction comedy film has delighted audiences with its memorable cast, musical score, iconic references, and of course, the DeLorean time machine.  Ronald Reagan even quoted the movie in his State of the Union Address when he said, “Roads…where we’re going, we don’t need roads”. The legacy of BTTF will surely live on for generations to come.

Today is not only a day to celebrate Back to the Future’s release and cultural impact, but it is also an opportunity to highlight the notable efforts of a foundation that was created by Marty McFly’s real-life counterpart, Michael J. Fox.

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Fox was diagnosed with young-onset Parkinson’s disease in 1991. Although this news was not made public for another 7 years, he has since committed himself to Parkinson’s research through his organization, the Michael J. Fox Foundation, which he founded in 2000. In its campaign to pinpoint the cause of Parkinson’s and uncover a cure within our lifetime, the Michael J. Fox Foundation has become the leading Parkinson’s fundraiser in the US, putting over $140M into research (The Guardian).

According to the foundation’s core values, the team is 100% patient-focused, comprised of risk-takers and problem-solvers that won’t stop until a cure is found – one that will improve the lives of people living with Parkinson’s today. Fox is correct when he says: “The cures we want aren’t going to fall from the sky. We have to get ladders and climb up and get them.”

With Fox, there was a story beyond a DeLorean time machine that needed to be told. After getting a better understanding of the core values of his foundation and how they are impacting lives every day, it truly makes us happy at Public Interest Registry to see the Michael J. Fox Foundation carrying out its cause and mission on the .ORG platform.

As the longstanding operator of .ORG, it makes us proud to see individuals, groups, companies and organizations working towards improving the lives of people through this online space. It is also comforting to learn that the values of .ORGs like the Michael J. Fox Foundation are directly in sync with our own values — to build a true sense of community, ensure trust and credibility, and to help make the world a better place – both online and off.

Marty McFly would be proud to see the impact that his real-life counterpart and the Michael J. Fox foundation is making an impact on the way back to the future.