#NGOs + Gov. + Businesses = #Collaborative; #2030NOW #SocialGood Summit

 

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[photo by Mashable]

The theme of this year’s Social Good Summit (SGS) is:

Big Ideas + New Media = Innovative Solutions; #2030NOW.

Why #2030NOW and not #2013? SGS is calling for long-term thinking about ways that new media and technology can be used to solve the world’s leading challenges. The idea is that long-term thinking will lead to long-term solutions that have a positive impact on future generations and ultimately make the world a better place.

SGS is organized by some of the worlds leading organizations in international affairs, philanthropy, technology, and social good: the United Nations Foundation, 92Y, Mashable, Ericsson, UNDP, and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. This event is not only an opportunity to unite people that are passionate about the digital social space, technology, and sharing information; SGS turns global leaders into global listeners, and it encourages important dialogue that we as a global community can take and translate into action.

578503_10151745210219457_2029167989_n[photo by Public Interest Registry]

The SGS is taking place at 92Y in NYC during UN week; however, +SocialGood and the United Nations Development Programme have worked to spread the SGS to over 120 countries through Meetups and Livestreams, where people all over the world have been able to tune into the one of the largest and most vital conversations happening on Earth.

The map below shows the distribution of Meetups that have taken place internationally in conjunction with the SGS:

social-good-summit-meetups[photo by Mashable]

The past three days have (without a doubt) been extremely rich in content, covering global issues, discussing existing and emerging technology that could be used to transform the condition of today’s world for the better by 2030. Here are a few soundbytes:

  • We need to think higher, feel deeper, and make sure that those who are not connected gain access to new ideas, technology and opportunities.
  • “It is a hope that someday 7 year old girls will say, “Mama, I hear people used to be poor in Africa. What was that like?” – Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, Under Secretary-General & Executive Director of UN Women
  • “The cost of inaction is starting to outweigh the cost of action.” – Paul Polman, Unilever
  • “Think about how to engage the unengaged by telling them real stories that make them want to change their own behavior.” – Ben Keesey, CEO of Invisible Children
  • All human beings have equal and inherent value; we are a global community.
  • “It’s not enough to connect. We have to connect on behalf of change for everyone.” – Melinda Gates, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
  • Change thoughts in order to change feelings; change feelings in order to change behavior.
  • Impact investing; use your entrepreneurial spirit to address social challenges.
  • “You shouldn’t be able to report about Syria without reporting how we can help Syria.” – David Darg, RYOT
  • Volunteering allows people to contribute their own talents to a given cause or mission.
  • Strangulation of regulation; we need to tailor policies to actually fit the needs of people. We can’t provide a solution if we don’t know the root of the problem.
  • “Without peace, there’s no development. Without development, there’s no peace.” – Jan Eliasson, Deputy Security General of the United Nations
  • If we define the future today, we declare our responsibility to take action toward making that future a reality.

The speakers and panels at this year’s SGS have been incredibly insightful and inspirational. Of all the sessions that have taken place thus far, one topic of discussion seemingly continued to surface and it really resonated with Public Interest Registry and our own initiatives. A number of speakers over the past 3 days have expressed the notion of global collaboration between governments, businesses, civil society, the independent sector, research, and science. With the SGS’s theme in mind, the frequented call to action has been to develop a platform that would allow each of these sectors to interact, communicate, and work with one another toward achieving the Millennium Development Goals. Collaboration. Collaboration! #Collaboration

While sitting in the audience, our team is beaming inside and out because we have been working on a digital platform that is directly in line with what these passionate people are envisioning in a 2030 world. Public Interest Registry – the longstanding operator of the .ORG domain name extension – will soon be launching a dual initiative to empower global Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) by connecting them to governments, businesses and potential partnerships in a single online space.

The first dynamic of our initiative is to launch 2 new domain extensions: .NGO and .ONG (the translated equivalent of NGO in Romance languages). These domain names will be “closed”, meaning that in order to obtain them, you will have to be validated as an NGO/ONG; they will only be available exclusively to these organizations in the effort to highlight credibility and maximize brand recognition.

The second dynamic of Public Interest Registry’s initiative is to build an online NGO directory that essentially functions as a “Facebook for NGOs.” When organizations register their .NGO/.ONG domain names, they are automatically entered into the directory and gain access to communication with government and business contacts. Our goal is to bridge the gap between sectors, prompt discussions and partnerships that will ultimately help NGOs become more sustainable, and encourage collaboration as a means to a well-defined 2030 (and beyond) world.

Here’s an infographic that explains how it works:

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This is Public Interest Registry’s first year of attendance to the SGS, and we are grateful to have the opportunity to engage in conversations about utilizing new media and technology to make the world a better place for all. That is truthfully a huge part of our mission and the purpose behind the .ORG and .NGO/.ONG domain extensions. It is our hope that .ORG continues to be an online space where people share their reason, their cause, or their crazy idea with the rest of the world; and that .NGO/.ONG effectively unite the independent sector with governments and businesses so that together, they can work toward #2030NOW.

ResellerClub and Public Interest Registry’s Growth in India

ResellerClub recently interviewed our Channel Manager, Anand Vora, who shared his thoughts about HostingCon and his experience working with ResellerClub.

HostingCon was held recently in Austin, Texas. This particular event is a great platform for registries to see what people are doing, especially in relation to the newTLDs that are coming to the Internet. With the newTLD applications, Public Interest Registry has applied for .NGO, .ONG, and 4 International Domain Names (IDNs).

A big thank you to ResellerClub and all of the resellers that have helped us develop messaging and gain a lot of growth in India through their channels!

Domínio .ONG será chancela de credibilidade para ongs internacionais via @idgnow

Fonte Original: IDGNOW
Por Cristina De Luca
Publicada em 17/06/2013 10:00

Grande parte das organizações não governamentais sem fins lucrativos, sobretudo em mercados emergentes, se depara com o obstáculo de provar sua legitimidade, principalmente na internet, onde as ações de crowdfunding e campanhas de arrecadação de fundos através de doações voluntárias.

Pensando nisso, a Public Interest Registry (PIR), desde 2003 gestora do domínio .ORG – são mais de 10 milhões de sites – viu na recente leva de expansão de domínios genéricos de primeiro nível da internet uma oportunidade para solicitar a criação dos domínios .ONG/.NGO, e expandir sua atuação, garantindo às organizações do terceiro setor, uma presença online “certificada”.

“Ao saber da expansão, pensamos em criar formatos que pudessem beneficiar as organizações sem fins lucrativos, nossas clientes ou não, e outras tantas ongs que hoje encontram dificuldade em ter uma presença global na rede, por seu tamanho ou ou por sua atuação local”, diz Link Nancy Gofus, ex-executiva da Verizon que, desde 2012, dirige as operações da PIR.

A ideia foi atrelar a concessão dos registros .ONG/.NGO (sim, ao registrar um, a entidade receberá automaticamente o outro) a um rigoroso processo de validação da organização sem fins lucrativos, no contexto local e global. Só ongs legítimas, filantrópicas e de interesse público, sem nenhum foco comercial, terão o registro. “Vamos atestar que a organização é de fato sem fins lucrativos, sem foco comercial e político, é independente e segue as leis do país onde opera”, diz Nancy.

“Além da questão da credibilidade, muitas dessas organizações enfrentam problemas para serem achadas na rede”, prossegue Nancy. Por isso, os registros .ONG/.GNO contarão com uma espécie de catálogo online _ uma espécie de páginas amarelas com um pequeno perfil com informações sobre o seu trabalho e links para mídias sociais _ onde as organizações sem fins lucrativos poderão expor seus trabalhos, suas campanhas para arrecadação de donativos e recursos, trocar informações e experiências com outras ongs de atuação similar em diversos países.

“Vamos construir o primeiro diretório global de ONGs. Esperamos que essa iniciativa mude o uso da internet para aqueles que estão mudando o mundo. A torne mais útil”, afirma Nancy, lembrando que muitas ongs não têm nenhuma presença na internet. O catálogo daria a elas uma página na internet, antes mesmo que terem condições de criarem seus próprios sites.

A intenção, portanto, é proporcionar às ongs um local seguro e confiável que lhes permita aumentar as oportunidades de engajamento, consciência e financiamento.

No catálogo, as ongs serão catalogadas por causa defendida, país, e região entre outros critérios que facilitem a busca. E terão acesso a ferramentas para o recebimento de doações através da página do seu perfil no catálogo. Outros serviços adicionais irão acompanhar os novos domínios. A intenção da PIR é a de , durante os três primeiros anos de operação, reverter parte da renda  com os registros para a oferta de projetos educacionais e ferramentas online focadas na expansão do conhecimento e capacitação das entidades no uso da internet.

Trabalho já começou
Embora a expectativa da PIR seja a de os novos domínios só estejam disponíveis em 2014, em função do longo e moroso processo de autorização da Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), entidades que desejem ter o registro dod domínios .ONG/.OGN já podem entrar no site da PIR e manifestar seu interesse.

O envio dessa manifestação coloca as ongs no radar da PIR, que pode já iniciar o processo de validação, e as permite estarem permanentemente informadas sobre o desenvolvimento de todos os processos de lançamento dos domínios.

“O Brasil já é o terceiro país em quantidade de organizações interessadas, atrás de EUA e Índia”, comenta Nancy, que visitou o país no início do mês para conversar com entidades brasileiras a respeito da iniciativa.

A muitas delas, Nancy explicou que os registros .ONG/.OGN são complementares ao registro .ORG.BR e até mesmo ao registro .ORG, embora muitas das mais de 10 milhões de organizações com o registro .ORG não preenchem os requisitos para terem os novos registros.

“É evidente que o Google.org não é uma organização sem fins lucrativos”, afirma Nancy, dando uma dimensão do quão rigoroso o processo de validação será.

“Há uma mistura grande de organizações que utilizam o .ORG. Há ongs, mas há também entidades de responsabilidade social de empresas privadas, clubes esportivos, associações comunitárias, igrejas”, diz Nancy.

No Brasil, o registro do domínio .ORG.BR já exige a apresentação de documentação que comprove a natureza da instituição não governamental sem fins lucrativos, de acordo com a legislação brasileira, e o CNPJ. Nos casos em que a instituição é um consulado ou uma embaixada, a exigência do CNPJ é dispensada. Até o momento, foram concedidos pelo Registro.br 47.659 registros .ORG.BR.

Como o Resgistro.br, a PIR é uma organização sem fins lucrativos. Nos últimos 2 anos (entre 2010 e 2012) viu os registros .ORG crescerem 47% na Ásia/Oceania, 25% na América Latina e 23% na África.

A atuação internacional deverá crescer ainda mais a partir disponibilidades dos domínios .ONG/.NGO. No Brasil,o domínio .ORG está disponível através de revendas de domínio e registradores autorizados. O mesmo deverá ocorrer com os novos domínios, embora a intenção da PIR seja contar com conselhos locais na tarefa de validação das ongs.

Why Are Brands Abandoning gTLD Applications? by @JenWolfe of @Wolfedomain

Original Source Posted by Jennifer Wolfe on Wed, Jun 05, 2013 @ 02:36 PM

A number of brands have recently fallen from the list of visionary companies applying for gTLDs. Hasbro’s Transformers, Hilton, GM’s suite of gTLDs and Heinz have all decided to pull their gTLD applications, opting out of participating in the first paradigm shift of the Internet.

Why? There two likely reasons — companies are having difficulty responding to ICANN’s clarifying questions that were designed more for an open registry than for brands, or they are balking at the costs associated with applying for and migrating to a gTLD environment.

In the grand scheme of business, both of these reasons are shortsighted, as companies with gTLDs will have significant brand differentiation and innovation opportunities as compared to those who have not applied.

The clarifying questions that may be troubling to brands involves explaining their gTLD strategies and financial models, as brands may not have determined their exact strategies or financial models at this point. However, a response does not need to include a full-blown list of plans.

For most brands, their gTLD strategy simply involves a migration of their .com business model into a top-level domain environment. While this could certainly evolve as new ways of using gTLDs are revealed, the basic model is pretty straightforward. In addition, costs are projected to be the same as operating a .com, plus the specific registry functions of a gTLD, and revenue should not be expected to change at the get-go.

The other primary reason that brands may be dropping off is that they question the value of continuing the application process and see the cost of operating the gTLD as much higher than with .com. While there is certainly a higher cost involved, I would challenge brands to consider whether the cost savings from dropping out is worth more than the value of moving forward. The answer for any large company is “no.”

To break this down:

1.  The cost to apply for a gTLD is $185K.

2.  The cost to migrate .com over and run the gTLD is approximately $250K per year (before you consider investing in innovative ideas). This cost represents significantly more opportunity and responsibility than .com, as brands own and can therefore leverage all the Big Data opportunities.If gTLDs don’t change everything, then this costs about as much as a bad ad campaign or a spot during the SuperBowl that doesn’t work. For big car companies, hotels or even the mighty Transformers, this amounts to a rounding error.

3.  If gTLDs do change the way everyone uses the Internet, then this is a cheap investment for owning critical Internet real estate and being one step ahead of competitors. And if gTLDs do transform the digital world and you abandon, then you are likely to go through this process again in the next round — not to mention wasting the investment thus far.

4.  I have talked with many C-suite executives at Fortune 500 companies, and most of them don’t want to be the leader who didn’t make a relatively small investment in the next big thing just because they couldn’t figure out how to answer some challenging questions.

This gold rush of the Internet is a calculated risk worth taking — acquiring the real estate you want is critical, and the price is well worth it. If everything changes and you have drop out while competitors stayed in, you could lose market position.

So don’t quit while you are ahead. Think creatively, get better advice, and consider that the cost of dropping out is far greater than staying the course of opportunity.

Support .NGO, A Public Interest Registry Initiative

Within a year new generic Top Level Domains (gTLDs) will be launched worldwide, joining the likes of .ORG, .COM, and .NET. Among the proposed new gTLDs is .NGO. .NGO will be the exclusive domain for local and global non-governmental organizations looking to advance their missions or to inspire their communities.

In preparation for the launch of .NGO/.ONG, visit ww.ngotld.org to submit your Expression of Interest (EOI) now!